Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete
Author: Angela Y. Davis
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 180
Release: 2010-10-08
Genre:
ISBN: 9781458786425

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With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life; the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly, the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable

Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete
Author: Angela Yvonne Davis
Publsiher:
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2003
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9781583225813

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Since the 1980s prison construction and incarceration rates in the U.S. have been rising exponentially, evoking huge public concern about their proliferation, their recent privatisation and their promise of enormous profits. But these prisons house hugely disproportionate numbers of people of colour, betraying the racism embedded in the system, while studies show that increasing prison sentences has had no effect on crime. Here, esteemed civil rights activist Angela Davis lays bare the situation and argues for a radical rethinking of our rehabilitation programmes.

Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete
Author: Angela Y. Davis
Publsiher: Seven Stories Press
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2011-01-04
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 1609801040

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With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable. In Are Prisons Obsolete?, Professor Davis seeks to illustrate that the time for the prison is approaching an end. She argues forthrightly for "decarceration", and argues for the transformation of the society as a whole.

Quicklet on Angela Y Davis s Are Prisons Obsolete

Quicklet on Angela Y  Davis s Are Prisons Obsolete
Author: Nicole Bemboom
Publsiher: Hyperink Inc
Total Pages: 28
Release: 2012-02-24
Genre: Study Aids
ISBN: 1614641110

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ABOUT THE BOOK Dr. Angela Y. Davis’ Are Prisons Obsolete? is a formative work about prison abolition. She explores and critiques the American penal system. The work is especially significant as the prison system continues to grow. She does not call for prison reform—although conditions will need to be ameliorated during decarceration—but for the eradication of prisons and their replacement with positive systems, such as schools, job training, health care and recreation programs. People have an extremely hard time imagining the world without prisons. We think that they are an inherent and unavoidable part of society. Davis examines the historical, social, racial, economic and political reasons and context that created the prison system, in order to "encourage readers to question their own assumptions about the prison" (Angela Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete? pg 10). Davis hopes that once these elements have been exposed it will be possible to "give up our usual way of thinking about punishment as an inevitable consequence of crime" (Davis 112) and imagine a world without prisons. MEET THE AUTHOR Nicole Bemboom is a San Francisco based writer. In addition to writing for the exciting new publisher Hyperink, she covers the best of modern craft and design for the online magazine Handful of Salt. She received her BA in Modern Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK In the chapter "Slavery, Civic Rights, and Abolitionist Perspectives Toward Prison," Davis examines the history of modern prisons, which started developing out of a reform of the corporeal punishment common in England during the American Revolution. Reformers believed that punishment “if carried out in isolation, behind the walls of the prison—would cease to be revenge and would actually reform those who had broken the law” (Davis 41). While this was meant to help people, it ended up growing into a situation in which prisoners were kept in unbearable silence and isolated cells, except while they did hard labor. Davis also shows how prisons took over the institution of slavery, which follows in more detail in the essay “Race and the Prison Sytem.” Davis examines the role of gender in the chapter “How Gender Structures the Prison System.” She finds the prisons reflect the gender structure in society, although she is careful to point out that defining women’s prisons as marginal helps to reinforce the assumption that male prisons are normal. She also details the terror and sexual abuse that is routine in prisons. Buy a copy to keep reading!

The Return of the Lazarus Generation

The Return of the Lazarus Generation
Author: Michael E. Evans
Publsiher: Armour of Light Publishing
Total Pages: 257
Release: 2008-06
Genre: Criminals
ISBN: 0981712002

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Abolition Democracy

Abolition Democracy
Author: Angela Y. Davis
Publsiher: Seven Stories Press
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2011-01-04
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9781609801038

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Revelations about U.S policies and practices of torture and abuse have captured headlines ever since the breaking of the Abu Ghraib prison story in April 2004. Since then, a debate has raged regarding what is and what is not acceptable behavior for the world’s leading democracy. It is within this context that Angela Davis, one of America’s most remarkable political figures, gave a series of interviews to discuss resistance and law, institutional sexual coercion, politics and prison. Davis talks about her own incarceration, as well as her experiences as "enemy of the state," and about having been put on the FBI’s "most wanted" list. She talks about the crucial role that international activism played in her case and the case of many other political prisoners. Throughout these interviews, Davis returns to her critique of a democracy that has been compromised by its racist origins and institutions. Discussing the most recent disclosures about the disavowed "chain of command," and the formal reports by the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch denouncing U.S. violation of human rights and the laws of war in Guantánamo, Afghanistan and Iraq, Davis focuses on the underpinnings of prison regimes in the United States.

Good Punishment

Good Punishment
Author: James Samuel Logan
Publsiher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2008-01-02
Genre: Religion
ISBN: 0802863248

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The author critiques the American obsession with imprisonment as punishment, calling it "retributive degradation" of the incarcerated. His analysis draws on both salient empirical data and material from a variety of disciplines - social history, anthropology, law and penal theory, philosophy of religion - as he uncovers the devastating social consequences (both direct and collateral) of imprisonment on such a large, unprecedented scale. The book develops a Christian social ethics of "good punishment" embodied as a politics of "healing memories" and "ontological intimacy"

Reading Is My Window

Reading Is My Window
Author: Megan Sweeney
Publsiher: Univ of North Carolina Press
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2010-02-15
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780807898352

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Drawing on extensive interviews with ninety-four women prisoners, Megan Sweeney examines how incarcerated women use available reading materials to come to terms with their pasts, negotiate their present experiences, and reach toward different futures. Foregrounding the voices of African American women, Sweeney analyzes how prisoners read three popular genres: narratives of victimization, urban crime fiction, and self-help books. She outlines the history of reading and education in U.S. prisons, highlighting how the increasing dehumanization of prisoners has resulted in diminished prison libraries and restricted opportunities for reading. Although penal officials have sometimes endorsed reading as a means to control prisoners, Sweeney illuminates the resourceful ways in which prisoners educate and empower themselves through reading. Given the scarcity of counseling and education in prisons, women use books to make meaning from their experiences, to gain guidance and support, to experiment with new ways of being, and to maintain connections with the world.

A Political Economy of Justice

A Political Economy of Justice
Author: Danielle Allen
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2022-04-29
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 0226818438

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Defining a just economy in a tenuous social-political time. If we can agree that our current social-political moment is tenuous and unsustainable—and indeed, that may be the only thing we can agree on right now—then how do markets, governments, and people interact in this next era of the world? A Political Economy of Justice considers the strained state of our political economy in terms of where it can go from here. The contributors to this timely and essential volume look squarely at how normative and positive questions about political economy interact with each other—and from that beginning, how to chart a way forward to a just economy. A Political Economy of Justice collects fourteen essays from prominent scholars across the social sciences, each writing in one of three lanes: the measures of a just political economy; the role of firms; and the roles of institutions and governments. The result is a wholly original and urgent new benchmark for the next stage of our democracy.

Rethinking Punishment in the Era of Mass Incarceration

Rethinking Punishment in the Era of Mass Incarceration
Author: Chris W. Surprenant
Publsiher: Taylor & Francis
Total Pages: 336
Release: 2017-07-06
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 1351692402

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One of the most important problems faced by the United States is addressing its broken criminal justice system. This collection of essays offers a thorough examination of incarceration as a form of punishment. In addition to focusing on the philosophical aspects related to punishment, the volume’s diverse group of contributors provides additional background in criminology, economics, law, and sociology to help contextualize the philosophical issues. The first group of essays addresses whether or not our current institutions connected with punishment and incarceration are justified in a liberal society. The next set of chapters explores the negative effects of incarceration as a form of punishment, including its impact on children and families. The volume then describes how we arrived at our current situation in the United States, focusing on questions related to how we view prisons and prisoners, policing for profit, and the motivations of prosecutors in trying to secure convictions. Finally, Rethinking Punishment in the Era of Mass Incarceration examines specific policy alternatives that might offer solutions to our current approach to punishment and incarceration.

Southern Mercy

Southern Mercy
Author: Annette Louise Bickford
Publsiher: University of Toronto Press
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2017-01-06
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1442663537

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From the late-nineteenth to mid-twentieth century juvenile reformatories served as citizen-building institutions and a political tool of state racism in post-emancipation America. New South advocates cemented their regional affiliation by using these reformatories to showcase mercies which were racialized, gendered, and linked to sexuality. Southern Mercy uses four historical examples of juvenile reformatories in North Carolina to explore how spectacles of mercy have influenced Southern modernity. Working through archival material pertaining to race and moral uplift, including rare photos from the private archives of Samarcand Manor (the State Home and Industrial Manor for Girls) and restricted archival records of reformatory racial policies, Annette Bickford examines the limits of emancipation, and the exclusions inherent in liberal humanism that distinguish racism in the contemporary "post-race" era.

The Idea of Prison Abolition

The Idea of Prison Abolition
Author: Tommie Shelby
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 248
Release: 2022-11-15
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 0691229759

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An incisive and sympathetic examination of the case for ending the practice of imprisonment Despite its omnipresence and long history, imprisonment is a deeply troubling practice. In the United States and elsewhere, prison conditions are inhumane, prisoners are treated without dignity, and sentences are extremely harsh. Mass incarceration and its devastating impact on black communities have been widely condemned as neoslavery or “the new Jim Crow.” Can the practice of imprisonment be reformed, or does justice require it to be ended altogether? In The Idea of Prison Abolition, Tommie Shelby examines the abolitionist case against prisons and its formidable challenge to would-be prison reformers. Philosophers have long theorized punishment and its justifications, but they haven’t paid enough attention to incarceration or its related problems in societies structured by racial and economic injustice. Taking up this urgent topic, Shelby argues that prisons, once reformed and under the right circumstances, can be legitimate and effective tools of crime control. Yet he draws on insights from black radicals and leading prison abolitionists, especially Angela Davis, to argue that we should dramatically decrease imprisonment and think beyond bars when responding to the problem of crime. While a world without prisons might be utopian, The Idea of Prison Abolition makes the case that we can make meaningful progress toward this ideal by abolishing the structural injustices that too often lead to crime and its harmful consequences.

The Prison of Democracy

The Prison of Democracy
Author: Sara M. Benson
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 204
Release: 2019-04-16
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 0520969499

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At publication date, a free ebook version of this title will be available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Built in the 1890s at the center of the nation, Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary was designed specifically to be a replica of the US Capitol Building. But why? The Prison of Democracy explains the political significance of a prison built to mimic one of America’s monuments to democracy. Locating Leavenworth in memory, history, and law, the prison geographically sits at the borders of Indian Territory (1825–1854) and Bleeding Kansas (1854–1864), both sites of contestation over slavery and freedom. Author Sara M. Benson argues that Leavenworth reshaped the design of punishment in America by gradually normalizing state-inflicted violence against citizens. Leavenworth’s peculiar architecture illustrates the real roots of mass incarceration—as an explicitly race- and nation-building system that has been ingrained in the very fabric of US history rather than as part of a recent post-war racial history. The book sheds light on the truth of the painful relationship between the carceral state and democracy in the US—a relationship that thrives to this day.

Women Writing and Prison

Women  Writing  and Prison
Author: Tobi Jacobi
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 305
Release: 2014-11-13
Genre: Education
ISBN: 1475808240

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This collection includes a kaleidoscope of voices and perspectives from prisoners, former prisoners, scholars, and activists to examine the extraordinarily invisible and closed system of incarceration that characterizes the massive U.S. prison industry. The book explores in multiple ways, the role of writing in carceral settings, including material realities, ethics, and social justice. It is a book about the power of writing as well as its limits. It is a book that celebrates and critiques, challenges, and reveals. It is a book that, like the writing of incarcerated women, repays careful reading.

The School to Prison Pipeline Education Discipline and Racialized Double Standards

The School to Prison Pipeline  Education  Discipline  and Racialized Double Standards
Author: Nancy A. Heitzeg
Publsiher: ABC-CLIO
Total Pages: 178
Release: 2016-04-11
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1440831122

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This book offers a research and comparison-driven look at the school-to-prison pipeline, its racial dynamics, the connections to mass incarceration, and our flawed educational climate—and suggests practical remedies for change. • Provides readers with an understanding of the realities of the school-to-prison pipeline—its history, development, and racialized context and meaning—as well as the continued significance of race and other socially differentiating factors in shaping public policy and everyday decisions regarding "deviance," "discipline," and social control • Examines the under-explored dynamic that places a predominantly white teaching staff in schools that are predominantly schools of color, and considers the roles that stereotypes and cultural conflicts play in the labeling of students • Suggests viable options for action towards dismantling the institutionalized racism revealed by the school-to-prison pipeline via both policy reforms and transformational alternatives • Presents information relevant to a range of college courses, such as education, sociology of deviance, sociology of education, youth studies, legal studies, criminal justice, and racial/ethnic studies

Passion in Philosophy

Passion in Philosophy
Author: Randolph Wheeler
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 185
Release: 2016-10-26
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 1498534686

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Among the first and foremost of American continental philosophers, Alphonso Lingis refines his own thought through a topic usually deemed unworthy of philosophical examination—passion. Lingis criticizes traditional scientific accounts of the emotions as dividing or disrupting our lives and argues for passion as a unifying force, a concept which invites philosophical exploration. The book’s structure is twofold. First, it offers an examination of Lingis’s most recent developments through the topic of passion with essays from some of the most established commentators on the work of Lingis. Second, it offers a substantial retrospective on Lingis’s thought in relation to some of the major figures in continental philosophy, namely Levinas, Kant, Heidegger, Butler, Foucault, and Nietzsche, all interweaving the theme of passion. Written to celebrate the eightieth anniversary of Lingis’s birth, these essays show how Lingis’s thought has not only endured over so many productive decades but also remains vital and even continues to grow.

Encyclopedia of Race and Crime

Encyclopedia of Race and Crime
Author: Helen Taylor Greene
Publsiher: SAGE Publications
Total Pages: 1024
Release: 2009-04-14
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 1452266093

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"The organization of the reader's guide—especially the groupings of landmark cases, race riots, and criminology theories—is impressive ... Other related titles lack the breadth, detail, and accessibility of this work ... Recommended for all libraries; essential for comprehensive social studies collections." —Library Journal As seen almost daily on local and national news, race historically and presently figures prominently in crime and justice reporting within the United States, in the areas of hate crimes, racial profiling, sentencing disparities, wrongful convictions, felon disenfranchisement, political prisoners, juveniles and the death penalty, and culturally specific delinquency prevention programs. The Encyclopedia of Race and Crime covers issues in both historical and contemporary context, with information on race and ethnicity and their impact on crime and the administration of justice. These two volumes offer a greater appreciation for the similar historical experiences of varied racial and ethnic groups and illustrate how race and ethnicity has mattered and continues to matter in the administration of American criminal justice. Key Features Covers a number of broad thematic areas: basic concepts and theories of criminal justice; the police, courts, and corrections; juvenile justice; public policy; the media; organizations; specific groups and populations; and specific cases and biographies Addresses such topics as gender, hate/bias crimes, immigrant experiences, international and cross-cultural issues, race and gangs, and race and law, Presents experiences of all major racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., including Asians, Blacks, Latinos, Native Americans, and Ethnic Whites, as well as religious minorities, such as Muslims Includes coverage of recent incidents like the alleged rape of a black female North Carolina Central University student by white male members of the Duke University Lacrosse Team;, the Jena 6 incident; the Tulia, Texas drug arrests; the Rodney King beating; the O. J. Simpson trials in the 1990s; and more recent racial profiling incidents Two appendices provide information on locating and interpreting statistical data on race and crime, as well as detailed instructions on how to access statistical data on the web for such specific areas as arrests, drugs, gang membership, hate crimes, homicide trends, juvenile justice, prison populations, racial profiling, the death penalty, and victimization Because the topic of race and crime is of wide interest and relevance, entries in this Encyclopedia are written in an accessible style to appeal to a broad audience, making it a welcome addition to academic and public libraries alike.